Article #5: Web Design: Where Do You Get Your Inspiration?

Web Design: Where Do You Get Your Inspiration?

(Fri Mar 6th, 2009, by Jenny Pilley)

It occurs from time to time, you don’t know where from and you don’t know how to get it you haven’t got it where to get it. Inspiration is a funny thing.

There are many ways people gain inspiration for web design or content. Some use a process and others merely just hope inspiration comes when they need it. Ultimately there is no set process to become inspired, which leads to mental blocks and many headaches.

Borrowing Ideas:

A method some people take to designing and writing is to borrow ideas from things they have seen or previously written. This is a useful way of gaining ideas when time is short and work is plentiful.  If previous work has been a success, then as long as the principle is different and there is enough distinction between the two designs or content, there is no harm in gaining inspiration from some of your own previous work.

Research:

Sometimes looking at other people’s methods of inspiration can trigger an idea and therefore create something from scratch. All ideas come from somewhere and it essential to know of a route to finding these ideas. Researching in different methods, whether that is searching for images, text or just brain storming ideas, can lead to fresh ideas sprouting from nowhere. These spur on the creative process and therefore give ground works for your writing or designing, whether that leads to something is never known till development.

Peoples Requirements:

Talking to customers and having a second input can make all the difference when making a decision for a design. Sometimes having guidance can accelerate the inspiration because you have an aim and a set of requirements to follow, therefore do not need to spend time finding information and filling through designs.

The Mental Block:

The most dreaded aspect of being a designer or writer is ideas drying up and the feeling that you will never become inspired again. The feeling that every idea you ever had was the last fills you with frustration and annoyance.

It is unavoidable, yet when it occurs, the frantic look for a spark to ignite the inspiration flame seems to burn out quicker than it can stay lit. However, returning to other projects or distracting your self from the task in hand, even for a minute, can start the process again, giving a clear indication of what is expected.

When the blockage is free, producing a piece of work seems to come naturally, until the next project ends up in your tray.

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